Tag Archives: Holeheads

First Draft

I think I just finished the first draft of my novel.

There are scenes missing and a lot of cleaning up to do, but I think I’m there. The first draft is as complete as it’s going to be.

I feel remarkably calm. I think it’s because I’m aware of how much work I have to do now.

I’m going to do a ‘scene grid’ or, as I like to think of it, a ‘motif grid’, as recommended by Stuart Horwitz. There are several things that came up during my last few scenes that I realize are key to the story and the character, and I want to make sure I’m getting them in early and often.

I’m going to try not to get overwhelmed in the revision process. Then, hopefully I’ll have a second draft, ready for polishing when I go to UnCon in November.

[small w00t]

I do enjoy my StoryADay stuff and the non-fiction writing I do, but nothing quite compares to the way I feel after I’ve written a piece of fiction. It’s lovely.

Into The Foggy Blue Yonder

Today, I typed up and tweaked the last of the writing I did on the plane last month.

I had used Larry Brook’s Scene Checklist from Story Engineering to help me figure out what I wanted the scene to achieve BEFORE I wrote it, which made it really easy to revise. I noticed that I’d forgotten which character was supposed to be having which emotion, so I tweaked that as I typed it in. Made it stronger. Yay.

Now What?

From here on in, it’s all new material until I get to the actual end of the draft. Because I don’t know exactly what happens next I’m going back to the Scene Checklist from Larry Brooks to figure out what’s IMPORTANT in the next sequence of scenes.

Using this checklist helps me avoid wandering around aimlessly in a scene.

It’s relatively easy to write ‘stuff happening’.

It’s harder to write good, meaningful scenes unless I know in advance what I’m trying to achieve: who are the key players; what’s the key piece of information I want the reader to learn (and have I set that up properly in earlier scenes or will I have to go back and do that?); what emotions do I want the reader to experience when they’re reading it?

Even if you resist outlining, this checklist is a really helpful way to get into the next scene you want to write. It manages to whet my appetite for writing the scene, instead of taking all the joy and anticipation out of it (as I always fear outlining will do).

The plan now is to spend a while, later today, outlining the next scene and thinking hard about what I need to achieve in the first draft of the resolution

It’s important to remember that this is the first draft of the end of the book.

It doesn’t have to be perfect, it just has to be written.

Sometimes The Slog Pays Off

Today’s writing progress: I found a fragment of Holeheads that I had handwritten back in June and typed it up today.  (Z’s on a boat!)

Threading the Bridges

I remember that, when I wrote it, it felt like a slog. It wasn’t advancing the plot fast enough. It felt like marking time. I only wrote about 600 words in that session then gave up, defeated by the weight of the amount of story I had to tell in the section after this one (which is kind of a transition)

But when I came back to it today, it became the framework for a bunch of character-development moments as well as simply filling a ‘how they got from there to here’ hole.

Sometimes  you have to slog through the unexciting parts to make something you can revise later.

Just keep putting words down and coming back and revising them. I guess that’s how this works?

Blogging About Writing

I’ve decided to blog every day AFTER I write my fiction words. I used to try to write random stuff first as a warm up and sometimes that works, and sometimes I run out of time. So I’m going to try to work on fiction first and then blog my progress. It might be boring, but I’ll try to share insights that will help Future Me (and possibly you, if you’re a writer-who-isn’t-Future-Me).

Saturday today.

I was, amazingly, up before everyone else. I did some other, random thing that was on my mind and then realized I should be using the time to work on my writing, so I didn’t get grumpy and time-grabby later.

So I did.

Of course, by that time, everyone else was up. And I made the mistake of cleaning out the office yesterday (even buying new chairs) so that this room is now attractive. A couple of hours alter and the entire family is in here with me!!

HOWEVER, I did discover that it’s entirely possible to write in here, with the whole family on the other computers and devices, by putting on my headphones and declaring “I’m ignoring you”.  The fact that they’re ALL here, means they all have someone to talk to, who isn’t me.

Everything’s coming up Julie…

So I typed in (and revised) a scene for my novel, Holeheads, that I wrote on the plane last month on they way to Scotland. It was incredibly sketchy at the time, but it gave me something to revise. I realized there was nothing in there about the people who were supposed to be pursuing the heros (they just sort of disappeared), so I added that. And I added some more emotion and physicality, and a bit more chat. The straight transcript was around 600 words and the revised one 700.

It is liberating to realize that what I write doesn’t have to be perfect.

I don’t have to be sure this scene is important or going to survive. I just have to write it down. I might end up cutting this whole scene out and maybe one sentence of it will survive. But the scene exists as part of the story (whether or not readers ever see it) and I needed to write it. And it was only 600 words. It’s not like I spent three months on it.

There. That’s me, conquering my fears, right there.

(“Conquering”. Ha!)

N.B. I also wrote what I think will be the heart of the final big sequence while on the plane. Haven’t typed that one up yet.  Looking forward to sharing pages with the critique group. It’s been too long.